Does algorithmic reckoning harm our ability for moral judgement?

Morality in the age of artificially intelligent algorithms

Christine Moser I Frank den Hond I Dirk Lindebaum
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam I Hanken School of Economics I Grenoble Ecole de Management

This essay starts from the premise that human judgment is intrinsically linked with learning and adaptation in complex socio-technological environments. Under the illusory veneer of retaining control over algorithmic reckoning, we are concerned that algorithmic reckoning may substitute human judgment in decision-making and thereby change morality in fundamental, perhaps irreversible, ways. We offer an ontological critique of artificially intelligent algorithms to show what is going on ‘under their hood’, especially in cases when human morality is already co-constituted with algorithmic reckoning. We offer a twofold call for (in)action. We offer a call for inaction as far as the substitution of judgment for reckoning through our teaching in business schools and beyond is concerned. We offer a re-invigorated call for action, in particular to teach more pragmatist judgment in our curricula across subjects to foster social life (rather than stifle it through algorithmic reckoning).

Moser, C., den Hond, F., & Lindebaum, D. (2021). Morality in the age of artificially intelligent algorithms. Academy of Management Learning & Education.


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